Homeworks Cartoon Network

Turner and Singapore-based Oceanic Group launch Cartoon Network Wave -- a fully-themed cruise ship -- as part of a historic collaboration SINGAPORE - Media OutReach  - 25 JANUARY 2018 - For the first time, some of the world's most famous cartoon characters will set sail on their very own cruise liner, Cartoon Network Wave . This fully-branded ship is the result of a partnership between Oceanic Group, Asia-Pacific's leading cruise management company and Turner, the global media giant behind Cartoon Network.

From left to right: Ms Christina Siaw, Chief Executive Officer, Singapore Cruise Centre; Mr Ricky Ow, President of Turner Asia Pacific; Mr Daniel Chui, Chief Executive of Oceanic Group; Mr Yap Chin Siang, Assistant Chief Executive (Policy & Planning Group), with Cartoon Network heroes at the Cartoon Network Wave signing event (credit: Cartoon Network Wave)

Set to make its maiden voyage from its home port of Singapore in late 2018, the 11 guest-deck, 2,000-guest Cartoon Network Wave will be one vast haven for Toon-loving travellers. With the ocean as a backdrop, families will enjoy the world's first immersive Toon vacation at sea, and an adventure with their favourite Cartoon Network stars.

While there are many existing projects by Turner's location-based entertainment team including Cartoon Network-branded restaurants, theme parks, waterparks around the world -- and even planes and trains -- this is the first time anywhere that a cruise liner has undergone a full Cartoon Network transformation.

The theming and entire onboard experience of Cartoon Network Waveis inspired by Cartoon Network's universe of well-loved characters from iconic shows such as Adventure Time, Ben 10, The Powerpuff Girls  and We Bare Bears . This includes a variety of diverse entertainment, activity and recreation features, as well as retail and food and beverage options.

Cartoon Network Wave will be docked at the Singapore Cruise Centre and will sail to 13 popular destinations in the Asia Pacific region including Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, China, Taiwan, South Korea, Australia and Japan. Dates and itineraries for its routes around Asia Pacific will be announced in the coming months.

Bringing to life the world's first Cartoon-Network themed cruise

Oceanic Group formalisedits partnership with Turner in a signing ceremony this morning in Singapore, marking the official launch of Cartoon Network Wave, the world's first Cartoon Network-themed cruise and Singapore's first homegrown contemporary cruise product.

Oceanic Group's Chief Executive Mr Daniel Chui said the partnership represents the company's commitment to capitalise on Asia's growing cruise travel market. "A homegrown cruise project, Cartoon Network Wave heralds the start of a new vacation experience for cruise-goers in Asia where cruise travel meets personalised journeys through experiential story-telling. With Singapore's position as a cruise hub in Asia, we believe it is only fitting that we dive right in and ride the surging tide of this passenger cruise wave."

"Cartoon Network Wave will revolutionise cruise travel in the Asia-Pacific region and create and curate new cruise experiences for holiday makers, cruise goers and generations of pop culture fans," added Mr Chui.

"Turner is always looking at new ways to bring our characters to life -- and Cartoon Network Wave will be their home on the high seas. The ship has remarkable potential to offer our existing fans a truly unique immersive experience, as well as create new ones. We couldn't be more excited by the partnership with Oceanic Group in jointly creating a world first," said Mr Ricky Ow, President of Turner Asia Pacific.

"The debut of Cartoon Network Wave as a new homegrown cruise product is testament to the vitality of Singapore as Southeast Asia's leading cruise hub. It will also augment Singapore's appeal as a top family destination by adding to the diversity of Singapore's line-up of offerings.  We look forward to more family visitors coming from the region with Cartoon Network Wave's exciting deployment here," said Mr Yap Chin Siang, Assistant Chief Executive (Policy & Planning Group), Singapore Tourism Board.

Online bookings

Online bookings for Cartoon Network Wave will start later in the year. More details on the booking dates and itineraries will be released on the Cartoon Network Wave website (http://www.cartoonnetworkwave.com ). Fans can also subscribe to Cartoon Network Wave's soon-to-be launched Facebook and Instagram for the latest updates.

Note: All information shown are subject to change without prior notice.

About Oceanic Group

A leader in the Asia Pacific cruise and leisure industry, Oceanic Group was established in 2009 with a mission to provide vacationers with unrivalled cruise and leisure experiences. Backed by a wealth of management and consulting experiences for cruise projects as well as floating homes and residential communities across Asia Pacific, Oceanic Group prides itself on its trademark ingenuity to provide specialised and innovative products and services.

Oceanic Group recently expanded its portfolio to include lifestyle thematic cruise projects that appeal to all generations of travellers. Adults and children alike will find themselves immersed in an onboard experience where each and every detail of the cruise is inspired by their favourite cartoon characters. With much to see, do and enjoy onboard, passengers are promised a cruising experience of a lifetime.

Oceanic Group is a member of the Singapore Compact and a signatory of the United Nations Global Compact.

About Turner Asia Pacific

Turner Asia Pacific creates and distributes award-winning brands throughout the region, running 63 channels in 14 languages in 42 countries. These include CNN International, CNNj, CNN, HLN, Cartoon Network, Adult Swim, Boomerang, POGO, Toonami, Warner TV, Oh!K, TNT, TCM Turner Classic Movies, truTV, MondoTV, TABI Channel, Tabi Tele, Mondo Mah-Jong TV, and HBO, HBO HD and WB in South Asia. Turner manages the business of Pay- and Free-TV-channels, as well as Internet-based services, and oversees commercial partnerships with various third-party media ventures; it teams with Warner Bros. and HBO to leverage Time Warner's global reach. Turner Broadcasting System Asia Pacific, Inc. ("Turner Asia Pacific") is a Time Warner company.

About Cartoon Network Asia Pacific

Turner's Cartoon Network, the number one kids' channel in Asia Pacific, offers the best in original animated content including the multi-award-winning global hits Ben 10 The Powerpuff Girls OK K.O.! Let's Be Heroes Adventure Time  and We Bare Bears .

Cartoon Network is available in 29 countries throughout Asia Pacific and is currently seen in more than 135 million pay-TV homes. Internationally, it is seen in 192 countries and over 400 million homes, and is an industry leader with a global offering of the best in award-winning animated entertainment for kids and families.

The brand is known for putting its fans at the centre of everything by applying creative thinking and innovation across multiple platforms. Cartoon Network also reaches millions more through its websites, games and apps, including Cartoon Network Watch and Play  and Cartoon Network Anything . Cartoon Network, sister brand to Boomerang, POGO and Toonami, is created and distributed by Turner, a Time Warner Company.

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Like all teachers, I’ve spent many hours correcting homework. Yet there’s a debate over whether we should be setting it at all.

I teach both primary and secondary, and regularly find myself drawn into the argument on the reasoning behind it – parents, and sometimes colleagues, question its validity. Parent-teacher interviews can become consumed by how much trouble students have completing assignments. All of which has led me to question the neuroscience behind setting homework. Is it worth it?

'My son works until midnight': parents around the world on homework

Increasingly, there’s a divide between those who support the need for homework and those who suggest the time would be better spent with family and developing relationships. The anxiety related to homework is frequently reviewed.

A survey of high-performing high schools by the Stanford Graduate School of Education, for example, found that 56% of students considered homework a primary source of stress. These same students reported that the demands of homework caused sleep deprivation and other health problems, as well as less time for friends, family and extracurricular pursuits.

Working memory?

When students learn in the classroom, they are using their short-term or working memory. This information is continually updated during the class. On leaving the classroom, the information in the working memory is replaced by the topic in the next class.

Adults experience a similar reaction when they walk into a new room and forget why they are there. The new set of sensory information – lighting, odours, temperature – enters their working memory and any pre-existing information is displaced. It’s only when the person returns to the same environment that they remember the key information.

But education is about more than memorising facts. Students need to access the information in ways that are relevant to their world, and to transfer knowledge to new situations.

Many of us will have struggled to remember someone’s name when we meet them in an unexpected environment (a workmate at the gym, maybe), and we are more likely to remember them again once we’ve seen them multiple times in different places. Similarly, students must practise their skills in different environments.

Revising the key skills learned in the classroom during homework increases the likelihood of a student remembering and being able to use those skills in a variety of situations in the future, contributing to their overall education.

The link between homework and educational achievement is supported by research: a meta-analysis of studies between 1987 and 2003 found that: “With only rare exceptions, the relationship between the amount of homework students do and their achievement outcomes was found to be positive and statistically significant.”

The right type of work

The homework debate is often split along the lines of primary school compared with secondary school. Education researcher Professor John Hattie, who has ranked various influences on student learning and achievement, found that homework in primary schools has a negligible effect (most homework set has little to no impact on a student’s overall learning). However, it makes a bigger difference in secondary schools.

His explanation is that students in secondary schools are often given tasks that reinforce key skills learned in the classroom that day, whereas primary students may be asked to complete separate assignments. “The worst thing you can do with homework is give kids projects; the best thing you can do is reinforce something you’ve already learned,” he told the BBC in 2014.

The science of homework: tips to engage students' brains

So homework can be effective when it’s the right type of homework. In my own practice, the primary students I teach will often be asked to find real-life examples of the concept taught instead of traditional homework tasks, while homework for secondary students consolidates the key concepts covered in the classroom. For secondary in particular, I find a general set of rules useful:

  • Set work that’s relevant. This includes elaborating on information addressed in the class or opportunities for students to explore the key concept in areas of their own interest.

  • Make sure students can complete the homework. Pitch it to a student’s age and skills – anxiety will only limit their cognitive abilities in that topic. A high chance of success will increase the reward stimulation in the brain.

  • Get parents involved, without the homework being a point of conflict with students. Make it a sharing of information, rather than a battle.

  • Check the homework with the students afterwards. This offers a chance to review the key concepts and allow the working memory to become part of the long-term memory.

While there is no data on the effectiveness of homework in different subjects, these general rules could be applied equally to languages, mathematics or humanities. And by setting the right type of homework, you’ll help to reinforce key concepts in a new environment, allowing the information you teach to be used in a variety of contexts in the future.

Helen Silvester is a writer for npj Science of Learning Community

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